From Precision Agriculture to Prescription Agriculture

Srđan Krčo and Boris Pokrić
November 8, 2016

 

According to UN reports, global population will increase by 2.5 billion over the next 30 years. At the same time, the number of people living in cities globally will increase from 50% today to almost 70%. Combined, it means that significantly more food will have to be produced with less people involved in actual food production. Not only is demand for greater quantities of food increasing, but production conditions are becoming more stringent, adding another layer of complexity to agriculture.

Closing the Loop with IoT—the Role of Control

Tariq Samad
November 8, 2016

 

In this "first wave" of IoT, attention has concentrated on wireless sensors, cloud connectivity, big data analytics, and mobile apps. The concept of IoT, however, extends beyond these components and capabilities. For example, a white paper by the IEEE Internet of Things Initiative defines a much more expansive vision [1]:

Comments

2016-11-08 @ 6:45 PM by Coote, Tim

Is a control model really new?  I had to include it in the architecture consumer facing IoT systems a couple of years ago.  An abstraction that may help is to consider the 'control systems' themselves as other 'Things' that form part of the IoT.  Such a model makes it more obvious that an aspect of IoT is the compute nodes, as well as sensors and actuators. It also makes it simpler to understand the need for peripatetic software.

There is already much work on how such distributed state can be provably consistent (e.g. embedded in the experimental systems based on E; and some work at HP-Labs: http://bit.ly/2eSjPp8). But there does need to be some research on how to fail-fast and fail-safe if visibility of relevant parts of the controlled system disappear.

Interestingly, some current consumer targeted controlling IoT systems have significant theoretical holes as they rely on 'eventual consistency' of dependency graphs.

Unfortunate system behaviour can also easily arise from dependencies that are not visible to the control system - or are too expensive to model accurately - , and, I concluded that a major issue is the simulation and testing of such systems at scale.

2016-12-13 @ 10:28 AM by Milis, George

Very interesting article and we fully second the need for control engineering to further exploit the IoT domain. We are currently working towards this direction and we have published some preliminary work in conferences, e.g.:

1. A Cognitive Fault Detection Design Architecture [WCCI2016, link to IEEE Xplore below](https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309778730_A_cognitive_fault-detection_design_architecture)
2. A Cognitive Agent Architecture for Feedback Control Scheme Design [presented at SSCI2016 last week]

In few words, we combine background knowledge on logic systems and inference mechanisms and couple it with background logic in feedback control (also fault detection) systems so as to enable online configurations that consider all sub-systems as IoT services.

Thanks!

George.

 

 

Looking for a Compass for Navigating the IoT Platform Landscape

Saverio Romeo
November 8, 2016

 

The market landscape of IoT platforms – software middleware for the Internet of Things – is rich in solutions with a continuous flow of new ideas. That is a sign of momentum in the space, but at the same time, an indication of confusion and controversy. Organisations aiming to run their own IoT strategy are facing the challenge of choosing a platform from more than 300 available in the market. The controversy lies in the fact that those platforms offer different combinations of services.

Sensing as a Service (S2aaS): Buying and Selling IoT Data

Charith Perera
November 8, 2016

 

The Internet of Things (IoT) [1] envisions the creation of an environment where everyday objects (e.g. microwaves, fridges, cars, coffee machines, etc.) are connected to the internet and make users' lives more convenient. It will also lead users to consume resources more efficiently.

Article 1

From Precision Agriculture to Prescription Agriculture

Srđan Krčo and Boris Pokrić

According to UN reports, global population will increase by 2.5 billion over the next 30 years. At the same time, the number of people living in cities globally will increase from 50% today to almost 70%. Combined, it means that significantly more food will have to be produced with less people involved in actual food production. Not only is demand for greater quantities of food increasing, but production conditions are becoming more stringent, adding another layer of complexity to agriculture.

 


Article 2

Closing the Loop with IoT—the Role of Control

Tariq Samad

In this "first wave" of IoT, attention has concentrated on wireless sensors, cloud connectivity, big data analytics, and mobile apps. The concept of IoT, however, extends beyond these components and capabilities. For example, a white paper by the IEEE Internet of Things Initiative defines a much more expansive vision [1]

 


Article 3

Looking for a Compass for Navigating the IoT Platform Landscape

Saverio Romeo

The market landscape of IoT platforms – software middleware for the Internet of Things – is rich in solutions with a continuous flow of new ideas. That is a sign of momentum in the space, but at the same time, an indication of confusion and controversy. Organisations aiming to run their own IoT strategy are facing the challenge of choosing a platform from more than 300 available in the market. The controversy lies in the fact that those platforms offer different combinations of services.

 


Article 4

Sensing as a Service (S2aaS): Buying and Selling IoT Data

Charith Perera

The Internet of Things (IoT) [1] envisions the creation of an environment where everyday objects (e.g. microwaves, fridges, cars, coffee machines, etc.) are connected to the internet and make users' lives more convenient. It will also lead users to consume resources more efficiently.

 

 

This Month's Contributors

Srđan Krčo is a co-founder and CEO of DunavNET, a company designing turnkey IOT solutions.
Read More >>

Boris Pokrić, DunavNET CTO and co-founder, obtained his PhD degree in Artificial Vision Sciences in the UK.
Read More >>

Tariq Samad holds the Honeywell/W.R. Sweat Chair at the Technological Leadership Institute, University of Minnesota.
Read More >>

Saverio Romeo is a Principal Analyst at Beecham Research.
Read More >>

Charith Perera is a Research Associate at The Open University, UK.
Read More >>

 

Contributions Welcomed
Click Here for Author's Guidelines >>

 

Would you like more information? Have any questions? Please contact:

Raffaele Giaffreda, Editor-in-Chief
raffaele.giaffreda@create-net.org

Stuart Sharrock, Managing Editor
stuartsharrock@ieee.org

 

About the IoT eNewsletter

The IEEE Internet of Things (IoT) eNewsletter is a bi-monthly online publication that features practical and timely technical information and forward-looking commentary on IoT developments and deployments around the world. Designed to bring clarity to global IoT-related activities and developments and foster greater understanding and collaboration between diverse stakeholders, the IEEE IoT eNewsletter provides a broad view by bringing together diverse experts, thought leaders, and decision-makers to exchange information and discuss IoT-related issues.