Privacy in the Internet of Things: Regulation vs Innovation

Cigdem Sengul
September 7, 2016

 

Every investor, innovator, and potential consumer of an IoT-based application asks the same set of questions: Is it useful? Does it work? Can I trust it? Among the three, the trust question is critical, as IoT extends to everyday items not normally considered computers, allowing them to generate, exchange and consume data with minimal human intervention [1].

Past Mistakes, Present Opportunities: Location-based Service Lessons for Consumer IoT

Prasant Misra
September 7, 2016

 

The pioneering vision of the Internet of Things (IoT), dating almost seventeen years into the past, is that of a ubiquitous society wherein people and "Things" are connected in an immersive networked computing environment, with the connected "Things" providing value to people or enterprises and their digital shadows, through intelligent social and commercial services.

The IoT4SDG Challenge

Stuart Sharrock
September 7, 2016

 

At the end of 2014 the United Nations released the results of the largest survey ever undertaken in its 70-year history, reaching over seven million people in 88 countries all over the world. The My World survey was one input to three years of negotiations and debate climaxing in September 2015 when 193 countries agreed to a set of 17 development goals and 169 targets to be achieved by 2030. In 2016 the international community is embarking on the implementation of these goals and targets. What’s this all about?

Social Engineering Attacks on the Internet of Things

Ian G. Harris
September 7, 2016

 

Internet of Things (IoT) devices are accepted and trusted parts of everyday life for many people today. IoT devices and networks are known to be more vulnerable to traditional cyber-attacks than traditional desktop/server platforms for many reasons including their limited computational power, use of ad hoc networking protocols, and limited battery lifetimes. A security risk associated with IoT which is often overlooked is the increased vulnerability to social engineering attacks which are psychological attacks directly on humans using devices, rather than the devices themselves.

Article 1

Privacy in the Internet of Things: Regulation vs Innovation

Cigdem Sengul

Every investor, innovator, and potential consumer of an IoT-based application asks the same set of questions: Is it useful? Does it work? Can I trust it? Among the three, the trust question is critical, as IoT extends to everyday items not normally considered computers, allowing them to generate, exchange and consume data with minimal human intervention [1].

 


Article 2

Past Mistakes, Present Opportunities: Location-based Service Lessons for Consumer IoT

Prasant Misra

The pioneering vision of the Internet of Things (IoT), dating almost seventeen years into the past, is that of a ubiquitous society wherein people and "Things" are connected in an immersive networked computing environment, with the connected "Things" providing value to people or enterprises and their digital shadows, through intelligent social and commercial services.

 


Article 3

The IoT4SDG Challenge

Stuart Sharrock

At the end of 2014 the United Nations released the results of the largest survey ever undertaken in its 70-year history, reaching over seven million people in 88 countries all over the world. The My World survey was one input to three years of negotiations and debate climaxing in September 2015 when 193 countries agreed to a set of 17 development goals and 169 targets to be achieved by 2030. In 2016 the international community is embarking on the implementation of these goals and targets. What’s this all about?

 


Article 4

Social Engineering Attacks on the Internet of Things

Ian G. Harris

Internet of Things (IoT) devices are accepted and trusted parts of everyday life for many people today. IoT devices and networks are known to be more vulnerable to traditional cyber-attacks than traditional desktop/server platforms for many reasons including their limited computational power, use of ad hoc networking protocols, and limited battery lifetimes. A security risk associated with IoT which is often overlooked is the increased vulnerability to social engineering attacks which are psychological attacks directly on humans using devices, rather than the devices themselves.

 

 

This Month's Contributors

Cigdem Sengul is a senior researcher at Nominet and works on privacy in the Internet of Things.
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Prasant Misra is a scientist at TCS Research and Innovation, TATA Consultancy Services, Bangalore.
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Stuart Sharrock has been working as an analyst and consultant in the telecommunications industry for the past three decades.
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Ian G. Harris is an Associate Professor and currently Vice Chair of Undergraduate Education in the Computer Science Department at the University of California Irvine.
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Contributions Welcomed
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Would you like more information? Have any questions? Please contact:

Raffaele Giaffreda, Editor-in-Chief
raffaele.giaffreda@create-net.org

Stuart Sharrock, Managing Editor
stuartsharrock@ieee.org

 

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The IEEE Internet of Things (IoT) eNewsletter is a bi-monthly online publication that features practical and timely technical information and forward-looking commentary on IoT developments and deployments around the world. Designed to bring clarity to global IoT-related activities and developments and foster greater understanding and collaboration between diverse stakeholders, the IEEE IoT eNewsletter provides a broad view by bringing together diverse experts, thought leaders, and decision-makers to exchange information and discuss IoT-related issues.