IoT: Smart Indoor Spaces with a Purpose

Daniele Miorandi and Iacopo Carreras
July 12, 2016

 

According to a study by the US Environmental Protection Agency we spend approximately 93% of our time indoors [1]. It is not surprising that over the last two decades significant efforts have been spent on developing information and communication technology aimed at making such environments better able to respond to our needs [2]. The approaches proposed were very diverse, to take account of the diversity in indoor spaces (Home, Office, Hospital, Factory, Car) and in the resulting use cases. Initiatives around the concept of smart spaces flourished, leading to a large body of scientific publications, demonstrators and prototypes.

Comments

2016-07-12 @ 10:07 PM by Peter, Samuel

Intelligent systems aligned with IoT have so far helped in solving multiple problems ever known to man since the advent of ICT into different fields of interest. The increasing pace of smart applications to handle complex issues is growing rapidly alongside with geolocation-aware systems to enable smart device connectivity and interaction directing the user to the nearest intended service spots, monitoring of a user’s activities, including devices, operating systems, browsers, location, time and so on, used to accessing online content in tandem with the user login account, a way to check or prevent anonymous sign in against security breaches.  Emerging technologies are gradually making everything smart now, which is all about gathering information, establishing trust with the connected device and its utilization to the degree of precision with other intelligence objects or platforms. Mostly, some countries of the world online grocery shopping have reached a remarkable stage with a competitive advantage in the retail market and channels in place for better offerings regarding internet sales, despite competitors online friction on the same products, customers still find huge penetration online. There are gains and pain that comes with the IoT, pertaining to privacy and security of users. A lot still left to be desire, in other to leverage the gap or challenges regarding smart systems, connectivity, relativity and its target domain.

IoT Standardization and Implementation Challenges

Ahmed Banafa
July 12, 2016

 

The rapid evolution of the IoT market has caused an explosion in the number and variety of IoT solutions. Additionally, large amounts of funding are being deployed at IoT startups. Consequently, the focus of the industry has been on manufacturing and producing the right types of hardware to enable those solutions. In the current model, most IoT solution providers have been building all components of the stack, from the hardware devices to the relevant cloud services or as they would like to name it as "IoT solutions", as a result, there is a lack of consistency and standards across the cloud services used by the different IoT solutions.

Comments

2016-07-12 @ 1:51 PM by Stevens, George

Hi Ahmed,

Thanks for the insightful article! 

You said "One possible outcome of successful standardization of IoT is the implementation of "IoT as a Service" technology".  Things are really moving fast in the realm of the cloud and IoT.  IoT as a service is already happening in at least one place!  In Microsoft's Azure cloud.

Microsoft's Azure currently offers their IoT Hub cloud service.  It is a publically accessible cloud service that provides very high capacity data ingestion and storage services for IoT devices that then can feed the device data into the storage and analytic capabilities of the Azure cloud.  Plus, the IoT Hub also has capabilities to secure, provision, and manage the IoT devices themselves.  Having used it myself, I think it is quite a nice package.  See this link for more https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/iot-hub/.

And Microsoft also has prefabricated IoT applications available that bundle the IoT Hub, storage, and analytics together in packages targeted at standard IoT scenarios.  Ready for you to customize them to your needs.  These are called the Azure IoT Suite and you can learn more at this link https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloud-platform/internet-of-things-azure-iot-suite.

I am not an employee of Microsoft.  But as a software architect I have used their IoT Hub and found it decreased time-to-market.

George Stevens

2016-11-16 @ 4:55 PM by MCCONNELL, ROBERT

I think we are missing a key bit in describing the challenges: reliability.  I do not hear or see discussions of how to insure proper operation under all network conditions, how to insure that "instructions" are understood, recorded, and the operation reported as complete when it is.  I think this is mostly a software issue.  It is no longer about getting wifi to your iphone, it is about potentially critical operational decisions in an automated factory.  Handshaking must be precise and absolute, etc.  I believe that the correct emphasis on reliability will make it easier to solve the security problem.

Agile Service Engineering for the Industrial Internet of Things

Thomas Usländer
July 12, 2016

 

In most cases, the development of industrial software applications cannot be isolated anymore from the technological trends in the internet and the more and more emerging Industrial Internet. This relates to the requirements of users who request remote accessibility of data and services via the internet to support new business models, as well as to the architecture, which needs to be compliant to current and future standards and products of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Analysis and design methodologies should also take this trend into account when being applied to the IIoT context.

The Future of Everything: Making Sense of the Sensor Revolution from a Telecoms Perspective

Martin Geddes
July 12, 2016

 

We are in the midst of a revolution in computing, driven by ubiquitous and cheap sensors tied to machine intelligence. In the 1990s the hypertext revolution gained a culturally standardized name, the Web. This 'hypersense' revolution has yet to gather its moniker. One common and sensible framing is the 'Internet of Everything'. It potentially touches nearly every industry and human activity.

Article 1

IoT: Smart Indoor Spaces with a Purpose

Daniele Miorandi and Iacopo Carreras

According to a study by the US Environmental Protection Agency we spend approximately 93% of our time indoors [1]. It is not surprising that over the last two decades significant efforts have been spent on developing information and communication technology aimed at making such environments better able to respond to our needs [2]. The approaches proposed were very diverse, to take account of the diversity in indoor spaces (Home, Office, Hospital, Factory, Car) and in the resulting use cases. Initiatives around the concept of smart spaces flourished, leading to a large body of scientific publications, demonstrators and prototypes. .

 


Article 2

The Future of Everything: Making Sense of the Sensor Revolution from a Telecoms Perspective

Martin Geddes

We are in the midst of a revolution in computing, driven by ubiquitous and cheap sensors tied to machine intelligence. In the 1990s the hypertext revolution gained a culturally standardized name, the Web. This 'hypersense' revolution has yet to gather its moniker. One common and sensible framing is the 'Internet of Everything'. It potentially touches nearly every industry and human activity.

 


Article 3

Agile Service Engineering for the Industrial Internet of Things

Thomas Usländer

In most cases, the development of industrial software applications cannot be isolated anymore from the technological trends in the internet and the more and more emerging Industrial Internet. This relates to the requirements of users who request remote accessibility of data and services via the internet to support new business models, as well as to the architecture, which needs to be compliant to current and future standards and products of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Analysis and design methodologies should also take this trend into account when being applied to the IIoT context.

 


Article 4

IoT Standardization and Implementation Challenges

Ahmed Banafa

The rapid evolution of the IoT market has caused an explosion in the number and variety of IoT solutions. Additionally, large amounts of funding are being deployed at IoT startups. Consequently, the focus of the industry has been on manufacturing and producing the right types of hardware to enable those solutions. In the current model, most IoT solution providers have been building all components of the stack, from the hardware devices to the relevant cloud services or as they would like to name it as "IoT solutions", as a result, there is a lack of consistency and standards across the cloud services used by the different IoT solutions.

 

 

This Month's Contributors

Daniele Miorandi is Executive VP for R&D at U-Hopper and Chief Research Officer at ThinkINside, where he is leading the design of innovative big data/IoT solutions for various vertical domains.
Read More >>

Iacopo Carreras is Chief Executive Officer of ThinkINside, where he is leading the company operations and product development strategy.
Read More >>

Martin Geddes is a computer scientist, a scholar of technology innovation, and an entrepreneur developing new network services.
Read More >>

Thomas Usländer holds a degree in Computer Science from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, and a PhD in Engineering from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany.
Read More >>

Ahmed Banafa has extensive experience in research, operations and management, with a focus on the IoT area.
Read More >>

 

Contributions Welcomed
Click Here for Author's Guidelines >>

 

Would you like more information? Have any questions? Please contact:

Raffaele Giaffreda, Editor-in-Chief
raffaele.giaffreda@create-net.org

Stuart Sharrock, Managing Editor
stuartsharrock@ieee.org

 

About the IoT eNewsletter

The IEEE Internet of Things (IoT) eNewsletter is a bi-monthly online publication that features practical and timely technical information and forward-looking commentary on IoT developments and deployments around the world. Designed to bring clarity to global IoT-related activities and developments and foster greater understanding and collaboration between diverse stakeholders, the IEEE IoT eNewsletter provides a broad view by bringing together diverse experts, thought leaders, and decision-makers to exchange information and discuss IoT-related issues.